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There’s no shortage of strange sports gambling stories. But this may be the weirdest sports gambling proposal we’ve ever come across.

Nebraska State Senator Scott Lautenbaugh has introduced a bill in the state Senate which would legalize betting on historic horse races. Yes, this Nebraska senator wants citizens to be able to bet on horse races that were run years ago. You may be thinking to yourself, WTF?

Well, here’s how it would work.

There would be new gambling machines (like slot machines) that feature old horse races. The machines would tap a library of tens of thousands of old horse races but would not display any distinguishing details like horse name, race track, date, etc to prevent people from doing the obvious: figuring out who won the already-ran race and betting accordingly.  The races would be chosen at random to further prevent gamblers from figuring out the races.

So people would sit at these machines, watching old footage of horse races and just bet on random numbers. Whamo. The weirdest state-sanctioned legalized gambling proposal in the history of mankind. Without question.

Now, we’re all for legalizing gambling. Almost every kind of gambling. But betting on old horse races without knowing anything about the horses seems like a new level of degeneracy. It’s tantamount to betting on squirrel races; actually, squirrel races would be substantially more fun (and easier to handicap).

States are increasingly desperate to find new sources of revenue to help their budgets. And they know the more state-run gambling options, the more revenue they’ll make. But this proposal is a new low in states trying to scape money from their citizens’ pocket. Instead,┬áNebraska should – like New Jersey – go fight the good fight and start the process of legalizing sports betting.

 

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